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How a CRZ violation is leading to a small revolution in Karnataka

Baad, a village near my village of Kagal in coastal Karnataka, hosts a fair every year at the Shri Kanchika Parameshwari temple. As children, the joy of going to this fair was unparalleled. During the fair, the yakshagana, a folk dance, used to take place in a big field near the temple. Instead of paying to watch this dance, my friends and I used to play a game of dappanduppi with mud stones. These memories remain as fond connections to our childhood.

In 2008, while I was completing the final year of my BA studies, I came to hear that this field had been sold and that a big resort would come up there. Many questions about why the owners would want to sell such a prosperous field, where farmers would grow rice and peanuts during the monsoons and vegetables during the summer months, plagued me.

satellite image of Nayak Hospitalities

Satellite image of the Nayak Hospitalities compound

Nayak Hospitalities (“NH”) was the buyer and as a result of the purchase, farmers’ fields, some public wells, and even a cremation yard, was acquired. Public access to a beach was also blocked. The loss of the wells affected the supply of drinking water to three villages – Baad, Jeshtapura, and Gudeangadi. After NH built a wall of about 15 to 20 metres height around the occupied land, fresh breeze from sea stopped blowing into the village. The villagers, who were also worried about the dangers posed by the crumbling of the wall during the rainy season, complained to the panchayat on two occasions and asked for the height of the compound wall to be reduced, but the panchayat did not take any action.

meeting with the people affected

Meeting with the people affected

As an Enviro-Legal Coordinator with the Centre for Policy Research (CPR)-Namati Environmental Justice Program, my job is to inform people about the law, and work with them to solve the various environment-related problems they face. I had helped conduct training programmes on awareness of the Coastal Regulation Zone Notification, 2011 (“CRZ Notification”) in Baad and surrounding areas. This led to discussions about the violations caused by NH and a decision to work together in collecting information, evidence, and pursuing remedies with the local authorities. Collection of information is central to the way we try to resolve problems. That way, if a similar problem arose in the district, a solution based on this case could be used.

Collection of information

The project had obtained clearance from the Ministry of Environment, Forests and Climate Change in December, 2010. Under this letter, permission had been granted to construct the resort on survey numbers 4 to 9, 11 to 13, 17, 19 to 21, 23, and 26 of Baad and survey numbers 14, 16, 18, and 19 of Gudeangadi. It also contained 12 specific conditions and 14 general ones but we observed that many of them had not been complied with.

Nayak Hospitalities compound area

Nayak Hospitalities compound area

  1. Construction on land in excess of permission given: The project had permission to construct on 5.26 ha, but ended up constructing on 9.67 ha. The land includes public property such as government wells, a cremation yard, a temple’s field, and also access to the beach.
  2. Construction in No Development Zone: Under the CRZ Notification, no new construction is allowed in the zone known as CRZ-III. However, the compound wall has been constructed in the 0-200m No Development Zone of CRZ-III.
  3. Access restricted: The lack of access to the three government wells located on NH’s property is leading to shortage of drinking water for the villagers living in the area.
  4. Non-permissible installation: The installation of a pumpset in the NDZ of CRZ-III is not a permissible activity. However, pumpsets have been installed on the NH site. This has reduced ground water in the region.

Advocating with authorities

I discussed strategy with the villagers and identified the relevant authorities. A letter was sent to the Regional Director (“RD”) of the Karnataka Coastal Zone Management Authority (KCZMA) office at Karwar. After a site inspection, the RD noted some violations and sent a report to the KCZMA and a notice to the proprietors of NH.

site inspection by regional director envrionment

Site inspection by Regional Director

Since no relief followed, the villagers and I decided to send letters to all relevant authorities including the District Commissioner (“DC”), Executive Officer (“EO”), and the Panchayat Development Officer (“PDO”). Site inspections were carried out and once again, notices were issued against NH. Upon request by the villagers, the panchayat on five separate occasions, gave notice to NH to reduce the height of the compound wall. This too had no effect. Finally, an order by the DC led to a reduction of the height of the wall from 15-20 meters to 6 feet. This was a small victory after two years of hard work.

Not a small victory

The victory was not absolute since the villagers still did not have access to the common land and the government wells. We used provisions in the Karnataka Land Reform Act, 1961, Panchayati Raj Act, 1993, and the Environmental Protection Act, 1986 and wrote letters to the DC, the EO, and the PDO. If any action had been taken pursuant to these letters perhaps a solution might have had been possible. The letters get transferred from one government department to another and my job then becomes to trace the status of the compliant. This is a waste of time, money, and energy.

The NH project is still inconvenient for the villagers in Baad and Gudeangadi and though their problems are not yet fully resolved, there is still hope. Through these two years, there has been immense support from the villagers of Baad and Gudeangad in working together to resolve the problems that they face. They now also have a pretty good understanding of the law and are in a position to seek remedies to their problems in the legal system. By working to get justice in this case, the villagers have also become more aware about the importance of the environment and common resources. This manner of legal empowerment has also helped them solve other small CRZ violations.

 

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Vinod Patgar is an Enviro-Legal Co-ordinator with the Centre for Policy Research – Namati Environmental Justice Program.

Written by myLaw

Declaring Independence: What to keep in mind when starting an independent practice

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Declaring Independence  is a series by Tishampati Sen, an Advocate-on-Record who quit his job at a top-tier law firm to start his own practice. Setting up one’s own practice at a relatively young age is a challenge, albeit one that can have great rewards. Every month, Tishampati will look at an important aspect of going independent and have useful tips and advice for young lawyers who just want to break free!

Ever since I graduated from law school, I have enjoyed a wide variety of experiences. I have had the good fortune of starting my career with a large top-tier law firm in Delhi-NCR, where I trained with some of the finest lawyers and learnt how to be a legal professional. I gained experience in the transaction side of the practice, as well as in the dispute resolution side. I handled large deals and conducted negotiations and also learnt to prepare matters, draft pleadings and appear in various forums. However along the way I developed a strong desire and passion to be able to start something on my own. So finally, egged on by my family, much to the horror of some close friends and colleagues, I took the decision to quit the firm and work towards setting up my own practice.

Before we move on, let me say this right up front, this project is in no way an attempt to show-case life outside a law firm, or conversely the life within firm or to discuss which is better. I am only using this platform to share some of my experiences and lessons that I have learned in the process of setting up an independent practice.

Moving out of my Comfort Zone

One of the first things that I learnt when I told people that I am looking to quit the firm to start my own practice, was how woefully inadequate my life is! I had been looking at the world through rose tinted glasses. One very prominent senior colleague in the firm smiled at me and told me that I was having the “law firm mid–life crisis”. There were others who told me about the people who had tried their hand at starting their own practice, failed miserably and then could not even find a job at a law firm again. The fact is that we know of all the reasons why such a move could end up being detrimental.

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But I noticed that once I did take the step, let go of the safety net and swam into the rougher waters, there were plenty of people to hold my hand and show me the way. The funny thing is that most people will tell you only about what could go wrong, and I guess to a large extent that is needed so that you make an informed, practical decision. But happily, there are quite a few very successful advocates and legal practitioners out there, who have equally, and sometimes more remarkably left cushy jobs to follow their dream of having their own practice. These are people who understood the internal conflict and self–doubt that I was going through and gave me invaluable guidance and a pat on the back. Their only request was that I persevere even when I cannot see the light at the end of the tunnel. I still remember how a rather soft–spoken, quiet sort of a man, had looked squarely into my eyes and had said with a force I have never before noticed in him, “If you have a safety net, burn it. Only when there is a fire on your backside will you make this work”.

FIRST STEPS WHEN LEAVING THE FIRM

So if you are in a law firm and have decided to branch out on your own, the first few steps could possibly include the following:

1. Save, Save and Save

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Definitely give yourself a few months (if not a year or more) before you disclose that you plan to move out. Use the steady flow of income that is coming your way to create some savings. One of the great things that my wife helped me do was analyse our spending and expenses for a couple of months (of course being told that I don’t really need a new PS3 game, was like being relegated back to school), and we came up with a number which would be the average monthly expense. Keeping a plan/sum in mind may allow you to save while still not living like a hermit. Savings are definitely a must, since it gives a bit of a reassurance as to one’s financial sustainability in the initial period. Panic is a very usual and daily emotion in such a state, but it helps if your partner or family member or friend can keep reminding you of the savings and assure you that you will be alive and fed, even if you make nothing, or close to nothing, initially.

2. Choosing the kind of work while in the firm

This, to a large extent, depends on the structure followed in the firm and whether there is any option for you to be able to choose the kind of work that you would be involved in. In the firm that I was a part of, while work was mostly assigned, one did have some amount of say and control over the kind of matters that one could opt into. The firm attracted clients who were large corporate houses, or businessmen, and the work, that I was initially involved in, was mostly in the nature of writ petitions, or Special Leave Petitions, and some company matters. But I realised that it would be a while before corporate houses would approach me and pay me to go challenge the constitutional vires of certain laws. Therefore, based on the advice of friends and mentors, I tried to involve myself in a wide variety of litigations including matters in the lower tribunals, civil suits, certain minor criminal proceedings etc., so as to get a wide base of exposure. Most people in a firm would agree that the attraction of any particular matter or transaction is also often contingent upon the billing rate and the regularity of payment by the client. However, at this stage of declaring independence, the attraction is for the specific forums where the matter is listed and the nature of the dispute. A word of caution, though: while doing this in the firm your revenue and billing may take a hit. Swallow the embarrassment of the scrutiny that your performance may be subjected to, and remind yourself of the larger picture. A good friend once gave me the following perspective which was helpful: “Take it like being taught important skills and being given essential experience, and all the while being paid for it.”

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Since my practice and work today includes both transactional as well as disputes work, I must share my learning on the transaction front as well. My experience in the firm on the transaction front was with the Projects team, under a truly brilliant partner and with an excellent team. Hence, I have always been very comfortable and confident in contract law, structuring deals and providing legal opinions on various rules and regulations. However, given the work split and team divisions in the firm, I did not have ample exposure to pure company issues relating to the shareholders rights, structuring and restructuring of companies. There seems to be plenty of work relating to the such company issues that are available for young independent lawyers to do. Especially, in the age of start-ups, corporate arrangements, shareholder agreements and restructuring become viable work opportunities. So while I had to pick up these skills along the way, with the help of friends, if you intend to do transactional work, get some experience on these while still with the firm if you can. It may not be as juicy as contractual, or other work, but get into it. You’ll thank me later!

3. Preparing the mind

Ask anyone else who has taken the same path before and they will tell you right out, your life will change once you have left the safe harbours of the firm. Of course there are many types of firms and how you feel will depend on the structure of the firm as well as how long you have spent there. But I never realised until I quit my job, how large a part of my identity was the firm name. Having had the good fortune of being a part of a top–tier law firm with a very recognisable and well–established name, I had always been very confident and proud of introducing myself to people and piggy backing on the firm’s goodwill. I guess it is presumed that since you are with this particular firm, you would be competent as an advocate and a contender. Corporates and business people recognise your firm name and you bask in its reflected glory. But once that identity goes, you are relegated to only being a lawyer. One of many. No matter how many times you tell people that you have your own practice or your own firm, unless you are (a) middle–aged, and (b) a known name (which is unlikely until you are middle–aged), it is often heard by people as “not employed”. One moment you are the hot-shot associate in one of the largest firms in the country and the next, you are just an advocate like the thousands around you. What’s more, the other advocates are more street smart than you and have something you don’t have yet – clients. Prepare yourself to re-invent your identity and image. You will have to build your reputation and goodwill from scratch.

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Simple perks like clean toilets, green tea, a court clerk who actually knows how to get things done, playing a cricket tournament as a part of the firm, running printers, office boys etc., may be sorely missed and the memory of the same could trigger a violent emotional outburst later. For all those who are overworked and stressed from working really hard in a law firm looking at going independent as a way out, to whom it looks like a way out from the crazy hours, working weekends, unreasonable clients etc., you are in for a shock! You will find yourself working just as hard (hopefully and eventually) when your work load increases. There are no longer any concept of weekends, all days merge into each other. Remember, shorter timelines for delivery and lower fees are the only USP that you have to offer in the period while the world figures out that you’re a legal genius and are willing to pay you top dollar.

KEEP THE FAITH

The one major learning I have had since I quit the firm has been that things have the propensity to work themselves out if one is willing to be patient and open to receiving help. Fortunately, as I mentioned earlier, there are plenty of very wonderful advocates and lawyers, who are very supportive towards ‘youngsters’ and happily act as mentors towards young advocates and lawyers. In the period since I quit the firm, the one thing that I am very proud of myself for is that I was able to swallow my pride, quickly get over my past identity and seek guidance from people who had been doing this before, including people who are younger than me. I have picked up invaluable lessons and tips on various issues, such as client handling, self–projection, preparing for a matter keeping in mind the concerned judges and the day on which the matter may be listed, settling upon the fee rates, and the way to remind clients and seek payment of the same. 

I look forward to sharing my experiences and learnings with you on this blog!

Tishampati SenTishampati Sen is an Advocate–on–Record  of the Supreme Court of India. He worked with one of the premier law firms of the country (in corporate transactions as well as dispute resolution) for many years before deciding to take the plunge of independent practice. He appears primarily before the Hon’ble Supreme Court of India, Delhi High Court and the National Consumer Disputes Redressal Commission.

Written by myLaw

When can a Civil Suit be disposed of without a trial? Lessons from the commercial courts law

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Framing of issues, as I had observed in my last article here, sets the ball rolling for a conventional trial, that is, the recording of the evidence of both parties. But is a conventional trial mandated in every civil suit? In other words, can a suit be disposed of without parties having to go through this rigmarole? Yes.

For instance, a suit may be disposed of through rejection of the plaint on the ground that, having regard to the pleadings contained in the plaint, the suit is barred by law under Order 7, Rule 11(d) of the Code of Civil Procedure, 1908 (CPC”). Order 7, Rule 11 provides six grounds for rejection of a plaint, some of which are factual in nature and some are procedural. Ground (d) is legal. Procedural grounds relate to curable defects and are not necessarily fatal to the suit. Factual grounds are usually treated as issues which require trial and therefore do not result in rejection of the plaint upon filing of an application invoking such grounds. These are framed as preliminary issues for trial and taken up at the stage of final arguments based on evidence led by the parties. A legal ground however, could result in the rejection of the plaint and even the decree of the suit, before trial. For example, if a defendant in a suit for copyright infringement takes the defense that the subject matter in which copyright allegedly vests, is ineligible for copyright protection since it falls outside the definition of “work” under the Indian Copyright Act, 1957, it may be possible for a court to reject the plaint and decree the suit on that ground alone if it concurs with the defendant.

Another provision which may be invoked to obviate the need for trial is Order 12, Rule 6, which empowers a court to pronounce judgment and decree a suit on the basis of admissions of fact made by a party to the suit in a pleading or otherwise, orally or in writing. This would, however, require such admission to be unequivocal, unambiguous, and material to the claim of the plaintiff or defense of the defendant, as the case may be. If there is scope for more than one plausible interpretation of the fact or further evidence needs to be led in relation to that fact, a court may deem it fit to allow the suit to proceed to trial on the ground that a clear-cut case of admission as required under Order 12, Rule 6 has not been made out by the applicant.

A suit may also be decreed in terms of a settlement arrived at by the parties under Order 23, Rule 3. While a judgement delivered under Order 7, Rule 11 or Order 12, Rule 6 is appealable, a consent decree is not unless the terms were arrived at by fraud or misrepresentation.

Summary judgment under Order XIIIA of the CPC

The CPC as amended by the Commercial Courts Act, 2015, has provided yet another way to decree a suit of a commercial nature without it having to go through the motions of a conventional trial. Order XIIIA of the amended CPC, which I have discussed once earlier in the series, provides a mechanism under which a summary judgement may be delivered in commercial suits if the conditions set out in the provision are satisfied. In a recent judgment of a division bench of the Delhi High Court, I had the privilege of assisting the Court in examining the stage at which Order XIIIA may be invoked, the manner of its invocation and application. I was instructed in this matter by the NCR-based law firm, Sim & San.

The judgement, which I would strongly recommend law students to read, discusses the institution of a suit in great detail with analysis that spans several provisions of the CPC. One of the questions before the Court, perhaps for the first time, was whether it is open for a court to invoke Order XIIIA suo moto in a commercial suit to dismiss it even before issuing summons to the defendant.

In addressing the issue, the Court undertook a detailed examination of the scheme of Order XIIIA, including its placement in the CPC after issuance of summons to the defendant under Order V and before framing of issues in Order XIV. A clear reading of the procedure laid out reveals the following:

  1. An application under Order XIIIA is contemplated to set the ball rolling.
  2. The application may be made at any time after summons has been served on the defendant, but not after issues have been framed in the suit.
  3. The application may be moved by either the plaintiff or the defendant.
  4. What the application must specifically contain has been prescribed in Rule 4 of Order XIIIA.
  5. The respondent to the application must be given a period of 30 days to respond to it.
  6. Apart from the evidence already on record, both parties may lead additional evidence to support their respective contentions.
  7. A date of hearing in the application must be fixed, of which the respondent to the application must be informed.
  8. The necessary grounds on which a summary judgement may be delivered by a court are – (a) that the respondent to the application (either the plaintiff or the defendant) has no real prospect of succeeding in the suit and (b) there is no compelling reason why the suit should not be disposed of before recording of oral evidence.
  9. Rules 6, 7, and 8 set out the various orders that a court may pass in deciding such an application.

Nowhere does Order XIIIA permit a court to invoke and apply this framework suo moto, much less dismiss the suit even before the defendant enters appearance. Apart from the fact that Order XIIIA does not empower a court to do so, such power, if it had been vested, would have been at loggerheads with the adversarial legal system followed by Indian courts. Extracted below are the relevant observations of the Division Bench in this regard:

“23. From the provisions laid out in Order XIIIA, it is evident that the proceedings before Court are adversarial in nature and not inquisitorial. It follows, therefore, that summary judgment under Order XIIIA cannot be rendered in the absence of an adversary and merely upon the inquisition by the Court. The Court is never an adversary in a dispute between parties. Unfortunately, the learned Single Judge has not considered the provisions of Order XIIIA CPC in this light. 24. In view of the discussion above, since no summons had been issued and obviously no application had been filed by the respondents for a summary judgment, the learned Single Judge could not have dismissed the suit invoking the provisions of Order XIIIA CPC.

  1. In view of the discussion above, since no summons had been issued and obviously no application had been filed by the respondents for a summary judgment, the learned Single Judge could not have dismissed the suit invoking the provisions of Order XIIIA CPC.”

 To me, the court’s recognition and reinforcement of the adversarial nature of the Indian legal system, notwithstanding the amendments made to the discovery mechanisms in the CPC in 2002 and through the Commercial Courts Act, 2015, is one of the highlights of the decision. In the near future, we can expect a few more decisions that revolve around provisions introduced through the Commercial Courts Act.

In the next part, I will proceed with a discussion on commencement of and preparation for trial.

Sai Deepak is an engineer-turned-law firm partner-turned-arguing counsel. Sai is the founder of Law Chambers of J. Sai Deepak and appears primarily before the High Court of Delhi and the Supreme Court of India. He is @jsaideepak on Twitter and is the founder of the blawg “The Demanding Mistress” where he writes on economic laws, litigation, and policy. All opinions expressed here are academic and personal.

Written by myLaw

How do e-Wallets like Paytm work?

abhishek-ray   In the dawn of demonetisation, most of us have found ourselves adapting to new payment mechanisms and methods. The government’s strong push towards a cashless society seems to be ushering in the age of the e-wallet. Paytm alone is responsible for more transactions per day than the combined average daily usage of all the debit and credit cards in India. Mobile wallets, which many of you are using these days, are a type of pre-paid instrument. But what are pre-paid instruments? How do they work?

Here are some frequently asked questions, which should provide some clarity on the conceptual and regulatory framework behind pre-paid instruments in India.

I am hearing this term for the first time. What is a pre-paid instrument?

Pre-paid instruments are payment instruments that facilitate purchase of goods and services, including by way of funds transfer, against the value stored on such instruments. The value stored on these instruments represents the value paid for by the holders of such instruments.

The issuers of pre-paid instruments have tie-ups with various merchants, and you can use the value stored on your instruments to carry out transactions with these merchants.

Ok. That’s a very legalese definition. Did the Reserve Bank of India come up with it? What is the regulatory framework for pre-paid instruments?

Actually, yes! The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) first provided the guidelines on pre-paid instruments (let’s just call them PPIs) in 2009. Over the years the RBI, issued several notifications (yes, they were not as dynamic as today!) in relation to PPIs. It then decided to consolidate all these notifications in a Master Circular (which gets updated on a yearly basis). Pre-paid instruments are subject to the Payment and Settlement Systems Act, 2007.

The latest Master Circular – Policy Guidelines on Issuance and Operation of Pre-paid Payment Instruments in India was notified on 01 July 2016. You can have a look at that here. You will find all the definitions and other details in this Master Circular.

Cool! So I guess then a PPI is a regulated instrument and one needs to have the approval of the RBI to issue one?

Yes. The RBI provides licenses to issue PPIs. All persons proposing to operate payment systems and involved in the issuance of PPIs have to seek authorisation from the Department of Payment and Settlement Systems, RBI, under the Payment and Settlement Systems Act, 2007.

Ok. If mobile wallets are one type of PPIs, what are the other types?

PPIs can be issued as smart cards, magnetic strip cards, internet wallets, mobile accounts, mobile wallets, paper vouchers and any such instrument, which can be used to access the pre-paid amount. A mobile wallet (Paytm, Mobikwik etc.) is one type of PPI. However, this is a dynamic sector and entrepreneurs are devising new prepaid mechanisms everyday.

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Mobile Wallets like Paytm and Mobikwik are Pre-Paid Instruments

Broadly the RBI classifies PPIs into the following types: Closed, Semi-Closed and Open Payment Instruments.

What are Closed System Payment Instruments?

These are payment instruments issued by a person for facilitating the purchase of goods and services from him/it. These do not permit cash withdrawal or redemption. As these instruments do not facilitate payments and settlement for third party services, issue and operation of such instruments are not classified as payment systems. (A pre-paid card in your canteen or a food court can be considered a type of closed system payment instrument.)

What are Semi-Closed System Payment Instruments?

These are payment instruments, which can be used for purchase of goods and services, including financial services at a group of clearly identified merchant locations/establishments, which have a specific contract with the issuer to accept the payment instruments. These instruments also do not permit cash withdrawal or redemption by the holder.

Mobile wallets like Paytm and Mobikwik are semi-closed payment instruments.

What are Open System Payment Instruments?

These are payment instruments, which can be used for purchase of goods and services, including financial services like funds transfer at any card accepting merchant locations (point of sale terminals) and also permit cash withdrawal at ATMs.

Debit cards are open system payment instruments.

Are there any limits in relation to the value that I can store in the PPIs?

Currently, the limit is Rs. 20,000 per month for PPIs where minimum details of the customers have been collected.

This limit can be extended up to Rs 1,00,000 per month after collecting the appropriate KYC (Know Your Customer) documents from the holders.

Ok. So what can I do with my pre-paid instruments?

Let’s only consider semi-closed PPIs from now on, as these are the most commonly used. Your scope of usage of a semi-closed PPI is dependent upon the number of merchants the PPI issuer has tied up with. Generally you can use your PPI for payment of utilities with these merchants and for transferring money to other PPIs.

e.g. Paytm has a tie up with Uber and not with Ola. So you can use your Paytm wallet to make a payment for Uber but not for Ola.

Ok. So what happens to the money after I transfer it to my PPI?

Every PPI issuer (like Paytm, Mobikwik etc.) is required to create an escrow account with a bank, where all the money collected from its customers are credited. This account is a non-interest bearing account. The PPI issuer is required to create a security on this account in favour of the PPI holders (customers like you and me). Therefore the holders are secured and in the event of liquidation/bankruptcy of the PPI issuer, the merchants/PPI holders shall be given preference to the other creditors of the PPI issuer.

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There are strict norms, which regulate any debit or credit of this escrow account. However at no point of time can the amount in the escrow account be less than the aggregate of the balance amount in all the corresponding PPIs and all pending payment instructions in favour of the merchants. So don’t worry, your money is safe with a PPI issuer!

Can I redeem the money stored in my PPI?

No. You are not allowed to redeem your money from a semi-closed PPI. However if that particular PPI is being closed or if the RBI decides to stop this entire product of PPIs (highly unlikely, the RBI usually does not reverse a decision), the customers shall be allowed to redeem the amounts stored in the PPI, within the expiry date of the PPI.

Who can issue PPIs? Are all PPI issuers NBFCs or banks?

Only banks can issue Open PPIs. Non Banking Financial Companies (NBFCs) and other persons can issue Closed and Semi-closed PPIs. These persons need to have a minimum paid-up capital of Rs. 500 lakh and minimum positive net-worth of Rs. 100 lakh at all times. Only companies incorporated in India are eligible.

As mentioned earlier, the authorisation of the RBI is required.

If I keep my money in my bank account it earns me interest. Can I earn interest on the amount stored in my pre-paid instrument?

The money in the wallet or PPI can only be used for transactions against the value stored in such instruments.

You will not earn interest on the amount stored in the wallet.

I heard of an offer where I can get cashback points if I use a mobile wallet. How does this work?

These are usually marketing offers. The merchant may be offering the product at a discount to increase sales. The discounted amount is then credited back into the PPI.

At times, the PPI issuer may also credit the PPI with an additional amount to incentivise customers. A PPI can be funded/reloaded by third parties, so the PPI issuer is transferring the cashback amount to your PPI.

Hope this is of help! Do take some time to go through the RBI Master Circular for more details.

Abhishek is a legal and business strategy consultant with ePaylater, one of India’s first one- click checkout payment solutions. This article should not be construed as legal advice. The views expressed in this article are his personal views and opinions. He can be reached at abhishek.ray@epaylater.in.

Written by myLaw

12 Angry Men (1957) and Ek Ruka Hua Faisla (1986) – The Courtroom as Red Herring

SayakDasgupta_InCameraIn 1973, a boy named Kevin Edward Noonan took his high school sweetheart to watch a screening of a 1957 movie. She had just earned a full scholarship to Princeton and was considering going to law school in the future. Perhaps he hoped that watching a classic legal drama would inspire her. And it did. She was especially moved by a scene at around the hour mark in which an immigrant speaks about the greatness of the American judicial system. “This, I have always thought, is a remarkable thing about democracy,” he says. “That we are… what is the word? Notified! That we are notified by mail to come down to this place to decide on the guilt or innocence of a man we have never heard of before. We have nothing to gain or lose by our verdict. This is one of the reasons why we are strong.” The young girl, whose only legal inspiration till then had been Perry Mason, was blown away. “I had never thought about the juries and their function until I saw this movie,” she later said. “This was my very first inspiration. When the watchmaker in that scene talked about the greatness of democracy being the jury system? It sold me.” The movie was 12 Angry Men, and the girl was Sonia Sotomayor, the first Latina to become a judge at the Supreme Court of the United States.

The Origin Story

12 Angry Men was originally written as a fifty-minute teleplay in 1954 by Reginald Rose, one of a group of bright, socially-conscious up-and-coming screenwriters of the ‘50s – a decade known as the golden age of television drama in the US (much like the present decade) – that included such legends as Rod Serling and Paddy Chayefsky. Rose was inspired by his own experience of jury duty on a manslaughter case in New York City. Initially, he had been reluctant to serve on a jury, but, as he wrote later: “the moment I walked into the courtroom… and found myself facing a strange man whose fate was suddenly more or less in my hands, my entire attitude changed.” The gravity of the situation, the sombre activity of the court, and the “absolute finality” of the decision of the jurors made a deep impact on him. He felt that since no one other than the jurors had any idea of what went on in a jury room, “a play taking place entirely within a jury room might be an exciting and possibly moving experience for an audience”.

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Opening pages of the stage play book

The result was a taut, gripping story about a jury that must decide the fate of a young Hispanic boy who has been accused of murdering his father. Eleven of the jurors believe that he is guilty, but only one man is unconvinced, and what proceeds is a tense debate on the facts of the case, a dismantling of all the ostensibly damning evidence, and also an airing of social stigmas and ingrained prejudices. A play written in the ‘50s will obviously have its attendant problems of representation; it might as well have been called “12 Straight White Men”. There are no women or persons of colour in the jury. But the plot allows for a range of characters fitting various archetypes. This becomes especially clear from the notes on characters and costumes in the stage play adaptation. Juror No. 2 is “a meek, hesitant man who finds it difficult to maintain any opinions of his own,” whereas Juror No. 3 is “very strong, forceful, extremely opinionated […] intolerant of opinions other than his own, and accustomed to forcing his wishes and views upon others.” Juror No. 7 is “a loud, flashy, glad-handed salesman type who has more important things to do than sit on a jury,” and is, basically “a bully, and, of course, a coward”, whereas Juror No. 11 “is a refugee from Europe […] who speaks with an accent and is ashamed, humble, almost subservient to the people around him.” There is the “man of wealth and position” who feels “a little bit above the rest of the jurors and whose “only concern is with the facts in the case”, and there is a “slick, bright advertising man who thinks of human beings in terms of percentages, graphs and polls”. Our hero, Juror No. 8 is a “quiet, thoughtful, gentle man”, a man “who wants justice to be done, and will fight to see that it is.” In other words, he is a lone warrior fighting an uphill battle against a room full of men opposed to him; an underdog fighting for another underdog. These are all tried and tested archetypes and they work really well.

Film Adaptations

The teleplay was adapted into a film directed by Sidney Lumet and starring Henry Fonda. Although the film didn’t fair very well at the box office, it gained almost universal critical acclaim, and is considered one of the most influential films ever made. The American Film Institute ranked it second in its list of the top 10 courtroom dramas of all time, just behind To Kill A Mockingbird (1962), an interesting decision given that an actual courtroom only appears in the film for less than 2 minutes; the rest of the film’s 96-minute running time plays out in an increasingly claustrophobic jury deliberation room. But there is no doubting its influence. It was remade as a television film forty years later by acclaimed director William Friedkin starring George C. Scott, Jack Lemmon and James Gandolfini. In fact, it has been repeatedly remade in various languages in various countries around the world, including Germany, Norway, Japan, Russia, France, China and, of course, India, despite the fact that most of these countries do not even have a judicial system that mandates jury trials.

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The Indian version, Ek Ruka Hua Faisla, directed by Basu Chatterjee and starring Pankaj Kapur, M.K. Raina and Annu Kapoor was made in 1986. At a run time of 127 minutes, it is half-an-hour longer than the original, but is a more-or-less faithful translation. And I do mean that quite literally. The jurors have the same personalities and even correspond to the same numbers as in the original. Many of the dialogues are direct Hindustani translations of the original English lines. Even some of the jokes are repeated. The racism and prejudice against Hispanics, immigrants and slum-dwellers displayed by some of the jurors in 12 Angry Men have been cleverly reflected in Ek Ruka Hua Faisla as upper-caste bigotry against minorities and the rising hatred for South Indian immigrants in Bombay that was being fuelled by right-wing groups at the time.

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Scenes from 12 Angry Men (left) and Ek Ruka Hua Faisla (right)

The Jury Is Still Out

But the thing to note here is that by 1986, the jury trial was long dead in India. There is nothing in the film to suggest that it is a period film based in the ‘50s when jury trials still happened, and yet there is no explanation for a jury in this case. In the Chinese adaptation, 12 Citizens (2014), the twelve men are assembled from different walks of life to form a mock jury as part of an experiment in a law school, a set-up that makes sense. As we had discussed in our video on the Nanavati trial earlier this year, the East India Company had introduced the jury trial in India as Englishmen considered it their right to be judged by a jury of their peers. However, even under the British Raj, English lawyers felt that Indians did not make good jurors as they were deemed to be irrational, swayed by superstition and religion and incapable of understanding the English language in which court proceedings were conducted. Various law commission reports suggested the abolition of the jury trial, the final one being the 41st Law Commission Report published in 1969. The Nanavati case is widely regarded as the nail in the coffin of the jury trial, which was done away with in the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973.

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Justice Y.V. Chandrachud (Image from supremecourtofindia.nic.in)

The public prosecutor in the Nanavati trial was Y.V. Chandrachud, who would go on to become the Chief Justice of India. It was during his tenure as Chief Justice that he was a part of the five-judge bench that presided over the landmark case of Bachan Singh vs. State of Punjab AIR 1980 SC 898, in which he and three of his brother judges upheld the validity of the death sentence under Section 302 of the Indian Penal Code, 1860. The only dissenting voice was that of Justice Bhagwati who felt that the death penalty was unconstitutional. However, the most important aspect of the judgment was the court’s pronouncement that the death penalty should only be given in the “rarest of rare cases”. In Ek Ruka Hua Faisla as in 12 Angry Men, the judge tells the jurors that if they found the accused guilty, he would be automatically sentenced to death. While this certainly raises the stakes in the films and makes the decision far more difficult, one wonders if a boy would be sentenced to death in India for killing his violent, abusive father keeping in mind the fact that there have been only 56 death penalty cases in Maharashtra since 1947. There are other basic inaccuracies that a layman might miss, but are glaring errors for lawyers who are familiar with the jury system. For example, in Ek Ruka Hua Faisla, one of the jurors is shown casually reading a newspaper just before deliberations begin. Anyone who is familiar with jury trials knows that jurors are completely sequestered during the pendency of the trial and are denied access to newspapers, television and any form of mass media in order to keep them absolutely unbiased. Similarly, while I am not an expert in American criminal law, it seemed improper of the judge in 12 Angry Men to tell the jury that a guilty verdict would necessarily attract the death penalty. It is my understanding that once the jury has given its verdict the judge sets a date for sentencing. Before that date, a pre-sentence investigation is carried out to help the judge determine the appropriate sentence. The pre-sentence investigation may consider the defendant’s prior criminal record, background, possible mitigating circumstances of the crime, the likelihood of successful probationary sentence, and suggested programmes for rehabilitation. It seems a little presumptuous of the judge to offer a foregone conclusion to the jurors before any of this has been done.

Flawed Greatness

Official Portrait of Justice Sonia Sotomayor

Official Portrait of Justice Sonia Sotomayor

But ultimately, there is no point in getting hung up on legal inaccuracies in a film, where the aim is to build tension and keep the audience engaged. While all the characters in the films are interesting, arguably the most important character is mostly invisible: the court. And while 12 Angry Men is a great film that had a positive impact on many people, it is not without its flaws. Justice Sotomayor, who counts the film among her major inspirations, admitted that, as a lower-court judge, she referred to it to instruct jurors on how not to carry out their duties. While speaking about the film in Fordham University in 2010, she said: “I would bring up this movie and explain to them that some of the things that happened, shouldn’t have happened. There’s an awful lot of speculation in the film.” The courtroom proceedings in the film are portrayed as a complete shambles. The defence attorney is described as incompetent and uninterested in the case. However, Sotomayor went further and also criticised the unseen prosecutor, stating that the job of the prosecutor is not merely to convict people, but also to investigate thoroughly beforehand to ensure the defendant’s guilt.

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Scenes from 12 Angry Men (left) and Ek Ruka Hua Faisla (right)

Like many other films based on the law, 12 Angry Men is suspicious of the judicial system and reposes more faith in the efforts and ingenuity of one bright individual warrior for the cause of truth. The largely absent courtroom in the film is cast less as a facilitator of justice and more as a hindrance, where lazy, bored and cynical officers of the court do a shoddy job of conducting a trial, subverting the judicial process, making it a farcical exercise. Rather than bringing some clarity to the case, the courtroom manages to mislead all but one man, making it the largest red herring in the history of crime. The twelve men, it would seem, have every right to be angry.

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Taking a stand on sitting down

SayakDasguptaA few years ago, I had read an article about the peculiar social and cultural differences between Japan and the west. It was written by an American man who had married a Japanese woman and settled down in Tokyo. He wrote of an incident when his parents-in-law had come to eat dinner. As they entered, the writer, as a matter of habit, proceeded to help his mother-in-law take her coat off and put it on the coat rack. He then realised that his father-in-law had not taken too kindly to that rather innocent act. The writer’s wife told him later that while taking your guest’s coat was a gesture of polite hospitality in the west, in Japan it was an act of deep intimacy – one only husbands can do for their wives. When it comes to love, the Japanese are culturally not as flamboyant, effusive and demonstrative as the Americans or Europeans (the Japanese millennial might be more westernised, but this seemingly still holds true for most of Japan). They don’t hug and kiss each other all the time. They don’t say “I love you” at the end of every conversation. Instead, the Japanese show their affection for their spouses and even their children through a hundred small acts that demonstrate caring and intimacy. This restrained, understated form of love might seem strange and even silly to westerners, but that doesn’t make it any less valid. In fact, it has its own charm and beauty.

This is also true of Indians. I am sure only a minority of the Indian readers of this blog will have actually heard their parents or grandparents openly profess their love for each other. And your mother or father might not actually say the words, but they show you they love you in other ways (making your favourite food, feeding you before they eat, giving you extra portions), and perhaps you do the same. Now, imagine if some people found this unspoken love ridiculous and made it a rule that every morning before you take a bath you must step outside your house and shout “I love my mother/father/spouse” loudly, for everyone to hear. Isn’t that strangely intrusive and oddly obtrusive at the same time? What does bathing have to do with loving your family? Why do you have to demonstrate to everyone regularly that you love your mother? Do you really need to remind yourself that you love your father? Will this make you love them more?

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Shyam Narayan Chouksey (Image from Facebook)

The Supreme Court’s interim order pursuant to the writ petition filed by Shyam Narayan Chouksey seems to suggest that your love for your country should be demonstrated openly and publicly every time you go to a theatre to watch Shah Rukh Khan romance an actress in the Swiss Alps or Salman Khan single-handedly beat up the entire Indian mafia. Many people have asked a very pertinent question: why movie theatres? On the face of it, playing the national anthem before a film might seem like quite an arbitrary way to instil patriotism in people. It’s like making people sing ‘Vande Mataram’ every time they open a book. But film as a medium is optimal for eliciting an affective reaction. When people go to watch a film, you have a large group of people in a single enclosed space completely focused on whatever is happening on the screen. It is the perfect setting to make you feel whatever the person in control wants you to feel. As author China Mieville has said, “You know how easy it is to emotionally manipulate you. Hollywood is a factory to manipulate you. That is what it does. That is what it is for. Emotion is very easy to manipulate. You’re in a darkened room, there are loud noises, there’s light shining in the darkness. It is an overwhelming experience in certain ways. I think quite a lot of the time when people say ‘I liked it’, what they mean is something along the lines of ‘I was temporarily stupefied by noises and lights for which my limbic system has no adaptive evolutionary mechanisms to respond with.’” The movie theatre’s unique ability to sweep you off your feet is why it has historically been the preferred venue for propaganda. Of course, it was in a movie theatre where this all began.

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The disputed scene from Kabhi Khushi Kabhi Gham (Image from YouTube)

In 2001, Shyam Narayan Chouksey was in Jyoti Talkies, a movie theatre in Bhopal, watching Karan Johar’s Kabhi Khushi Kabhi Gham. In one scene clearly designed to pull at the heartstrings of the patriotic NRI, an Indian-origin child born in the UK surprises his parents by singing the Indian national anthem at an event in his preppy private school. Mr. Chouksey immediately stood up for the anthem, but was inconsolably dismayed to see that everyone else hadn’t done the same. In fact, some even booed at him (probably because he was blocking the screen). He was also angered by the movie’s treatment of the national anthem. He filed a writ at the Madhya Pradesh High Court and it went to a double bench. Coincidentally, one of the judges was Dipak Misra J, the same judge who delivered the interim order on November 30, 2016. The 2003 judgment delivered by Misra J is quite a read, with several paragraphs dedicated to flowery, grandiose, baroque (to the point of incoherence) praise of the national anthem. “The national anthem is pivotal and centripodal to the basic conception of sovereignty and integrity of India,” it declares. “It is the marrow of nationalism, hypostasis of patriotism, nucleus of national heritage, substratum of culture and epitome of national honour.” Denouncing the scene in the film in which a young boy falters while singing the national anthem, Misra J writes: “They have not kept in mind ‘vox populi, vox dei’. The producer and the director have allowed the National Anthem of Bharat, the alpha and omega of the country to the backseat. On a first flush it may look like a magnum opus of patriotism but on a deeper probe and greater scrutiny it is a simulacrum having the semblance but sans real substance. There cannot be like Caesar’s thrasonical brags of ‘veni, vidi, vici.’ The boy cannot be allowed to make his innocence a parents rodomontrade, at the cost of national honour. In our view it is contrary to national ethos and an anathema to the sanguinity of the national feeling. It is an exposition of ad libitum.” The High Court’s decision was to ban Kabhi Khushi Kabhi Gham until the scene in question was deleted.

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Justice O. Chinnappa Reddy who delivered the Bijoe Emmanuel judgment (Image from supremecourtofindia.nic.in)

The judgment referred extensively to the landmark case of Bijoe Emmanuel & Ors. vs. State of Kerala & Ors. AIR 1987 SC 748. On July 8, 1985, the Emmanuel siblings – 15-year-old Bijoe, 13-year-old Binu and 10-year-old Bindu – were attending school when the headmistress announced that the national anthem would be sung in the classroom. The siblings stood up but did not sing, as they were Jehovah’s Witnesses, a specific Christian sect that prohibits its followers from singing in praise of anything or anyone apart from their god. Their father, V.J. Emmanuel asked for a special concession for his children on religious grounds and the headmistress and senior teachers agreed. However, word reached a member of the legislative assembly who raised the matter in the house and soon a senior school inspector ordered the headmistress to expel the children. Mr. Emmanuel filed a writ petition in the Kerala High Court, but when the decision went against him, he appealed to the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court upheld the students’ right not to sing the national anthem, stating that their fundamental rights under Articles 19(1)(a) and 25(1) had been infringed. In its 2003 judgment, the Madhya Pradesh High Court seems to have relied specifically on the following paragraph from the Bijoe Emmanuel judgment: “We may at once say that there is no provisions of law which obliges anyone to sing the National Anthem nor do we think that it is disrespectful to the National Anthem if a person who stands up respectfully when the National Anthem is sung does not join the singing. It is true Art. 51-A(a) of the Constitution enjoins a duty on every citizen of India ‘to abide by the Constitution and respect its ideals and institutions, the National Flag and the National Anthem.’ Proper respect is shown to the National Anthem by standing up when the National Anthem is sung. It will not be right to say that disrespect is shown by not joining in the singing.”

Misra J seems to have relied on a literal reading of this paragraph when he, in the interim order dated November 30, 2016, made it compulsory for all moviegoers to stand up when the national anthem plays in a movie theatre. He writes in the order, “Be it stated, a time has come, the citizens of the country must realise that they live in a nation and are duty bound to show respect to National Anthem which is the symbol of the Constitutional Patriotism and inherent national quality. It does not allow any different notion or the perception of individual rights, that have individually thought of have no space. [sic] The idea is constitutionally impermissible.” And showing respect means standing because that has been mentioned in the Bijoe Emmanuel judgment. One wonders, if there had been no Bijoe Emmanuel judgment, would the order have made it compulsory for people to sing it as well? Just like there is no provision of law that obliges anyone to sing the national anthem, there is also no provision that obliges anyone to stand for the national anthem. The Prevention of Insults to National Honour Act, 1971, a tiny act with just four sections, states in Section 3: “Whoever intentionally prevents the singing of the Indian National Anthem or causes disturbances to any assembly engaged in such singing shall be punished with imprisonment for a term, which may extend to three years, or with fine, or with both.” Would sitting quietly during the singing of the national anthem constitute prevention of singing the national anthem?

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Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Earlier this year, American football player Colin Kaepernick caused a huge controversy in the US when he sat or kneeled during the American national anthem in a series of matches to protest the killing of several black US citizens by the police. Was he being unpatriotic? Many of his fellow athletes didn’t think so and joined him. When asked about it in an interview, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said, “I think it’s really dumb of them. Would I arrest them for doing it? No. I think it’s dumb and disrespectful. I would have the same answer if you asked me about flag-burning. I think it’s a terrible thing to do. But I wouldn’t lock a person up for doing it. I would point out how ridiculous it seems to me to do such an act. It’s dangerous to arrest people for conduct that doesn’t jeopardise the health or well-being of other people. It is a symbol they are engaged in.” This is the point. Forcing people to demonstrate faux patriotism under the threat of arrest is dangerously close to totalitarianism. Playing the national anthem in movie theatres serves no reasonable purpose and has, in fact, been the cause for violence in the recent past, including the case of Salil Chaturvedi, who was assaulted in a movie theatre in Goa for not standing up for the national anthem. Why did he not stand up? He is a paraplegic. In the 90s, he had represented India in two wheelchair tennis tournaments. “Irrespective of my contribution to the country, I still need to prove my patriotism,” he said. People have varied relationships with their nation and have varied ways of expressing them. Forcing everyone to conform to one arbitrary way of engaging with their country will not make them more patriotic. As Justice Chinnappa Reddy said at the very end of the Bijoe Emmanuel judgment, underlining, in my opinion, the true spirit of the decision: “our tradition teaches tolerance; our philosophy preaches tolerance; our constitution practices tolerance; let us not dilute it.”

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Rabindranath Tagore

One last thing. The author of our national anthem, Rabindranath Tagore, was often very vocally critical of the very concept of a “Nation”. In 1916, he visited Japan and was alarmed by what was being done in the name of nationalism there. I started this piece with Japan and it seems natural that I should end with Tagore’s observations about it: “I have seen in Japan the voluntary submission of the whole people to the trimming of their minds and clipping of their freedom by their government, which through various educational agencies regulates their thoughts, manufactures their feelings, becomes suspiciously watchful when they show signs of inclining toward the spiritual, leading them through a narrow path not toward what is true but what is necessary for the complete welding of them into one uniform mass according to its own recipe. The people accept this all-pervading mental slavery with cheerfulness and pride because of their nervous desire to turn themselves into a machine of power, called the Nation, and emulate other machines in their collective worldliness.”

(Sayak Dasgupta wanders around myLaw.net looking for things to do.)

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Gap between the law and practice of environmental law keeping you up at night? Download this e-book now!

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[Video] Mathura: The rape that changed India

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Click to watch now

Not many remember that 40 years before the horrific events of December 16, 2012, there was another incident, where a girl even younger than Jyoti Singh was raped.

Her name was Mathura and she was raped by police constables.

She survived and appealed to our courts but did not get justice.

Mathura’s journey through the criminal justice system however, gave rise to a women’s movement that spanned the whole of India and led in 1983, to groundbreaking change in the law on sexual violence against women.

It also inspired an extraordinary act of courage from four law professors who dared to raise their voices against the judiciary and pursue legal reform.

Join us to learn from Padma Shri Professor Upendra Baxi, Dean of the Delhi University Faculty of Law Professor Ved Kumari, and Senior Advocate Rebecca John, the story of Mathura’s rape, its transformation of our vocabulary on sexual violence, the changes it brought about in the law, and the inspiring personalities who made it happen.

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What’s the issue – Understand why and how courts frame issues in civil suits

JSaiDeepak_OnTrialIt helps to occasionally step back and seek the true meaning of an element of procedure. This is true about the framing of issues in a civil suit since the significance of this step in a trial is often taken for granted.

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What is an issue?

The title of Order 14 of the Code of Civil Procedure, 1908 (“CPC”) is “Settlement of Issues and Determination of Suit on Issues of Law or on Issues Agreed Upon”. Clearly, a suit is determined on the basis of issues of law or other issues agreed upon by the parties in a suit. But what is an “issue”? Although the CPC does not define the term, Sub-rule 1 of Rule 1 of Order 14 says that issues arise when a material proposition of fact or law is affirmed by one party and denied by the other. In other words, both parties must disagree on a material proposition of fact or law.

The Evidence Act, 1872 also defines “Facts in issue” to mean and include any fact which, either by itself or in connection with other facts, has a bearing on a right or liability asserted or denied in a suit. According to the explanation to this definition, when a court records an issue of fact under the CPC, the fact to be asserted or denied in response to such an issue would also be treated as a fact in issue.

What is a material proposition giving rise to an issue? Sub-rule 2 of Rule 1 states that material propositions are those propositions of law or facts which a plaintiff must allege in order to show a right to sue or a defendant must allege in order to constitute a defence. Simply put, a material proposition is one that advances a party’s case factually or legally.

Sub-rule 3 mandates that each material proposition on which the parties disagree shall be framed as a distinct issue. Could it be said therefore, that propositions of fact or law which do not further a party’s case are not material and therefore ought not to be framed as issues? What consequences follow when a proposition of fact or law, although material, is not framed as an issue despite the parties being at variance with each other?

On this, the Supreme Court has held that the non-framing of an issue does not vitiate the proceedings as long as the pleadings of parties bear out that the issue exists and both parties have led evidence at trial to prove their respective contentions on the issue. In other words, a court can rule on an issue even if it has not been specifically framed, so long as it is material to the determination of the suit.

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The process of framing

How does a court go about framing an issue? Sub-rule 5 of Rule 1 lays down the procedure for this. At the first hearing of a suit, the court shall, after reading the plaint and the written statement, and after examination under Order 10 Rule 2, and after hearing the parties or their counsel, ascertain upon what material propositions of fact or law the parties are at variance, and shall then proceed to frame and record the issues on which the right decision of the case appears to depend.

What does this mean? Simply, that a court has to understand the contentions of the parties from their written pleadings and oral submissions and distill only those propositions of fact and law on which the parties differ and which are “material” for the adjudication of the suit. The question of materiality in Sub-rule 5 has no bearing on the tenability of the contentions of parties on factual or legal propositions. It simply refers to testing an issue for its relevance to the determination of the case.

For instance, in a suit for patent infringement, if there is no dispute between the parties about the plaintiff’s ownership of the patent, there is no point in framing an issue on it. Even though the question of ownership is material, the parties do not disagree on it. Contrast this with a situation where the plaintiff claims to be an assignee of the erstwhile patent owner and the defendant disputes the fact of assignment. The question of ownership or assignment of the patent is material because under the Patents Act, only a patentee or the exclusive licensee may institute a suit for infringement. In other words, the maintainability of the plaintiff’s action is in question. Moreover, since the parties disagree on this material question, the court has to frame an issue on it.

This procedure of framing of an issue needs to be clearly understood. Some people tend to read more into the mere framing of an issue under Order 14 than is warranted. The framing of an issue does not amount to a court taking a position on the contentions of the parties on a material question of fact or law. The court is merely etching the contours of the trial so that the progress of the trial is not waylaid by a slugfest on immaterial issues that have no bearing on the adjudication of the rights and liabilities of the parties. Reading the Supreme Court’s decision in Makhanlal Bangal v. Manas Bhunia (2001), delivered in the context of the Representation of the People Act, 1951, but relevant since the procedure under the CPC applies to the statute, will help clear the fog around the framing of issues.

In the next post, I will deal with the commencement of trial.

Sai Deepak is an engineer-turned-law firm partner-turned-arguing counsel. Sai is the founder of Law Chambers of J. Sai Deepak and appears primarily before the High Court of Delhi and the Supreme Court of India. He is @jsaideepak on Twitter and is the founder of the blawg “The Demanding Mistress” where he writes on economic laws, litigation, and policy. All opinions expressed here are academic and personal.

We hope you liked this article. You might want to check out our course on Essentials of Procedure And Jurisdiction!

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More tools for litigators after Commercial Courts Act boosts discovery in India

JSaiDeepak_OnTrialI have often heard it lamented that India lacks U.S.-style discovery mechanisms at trial. While I am no expert on U.S. procedural law, I believe that Indian civil procedure contains substantial mechanisms for discovery. Let us now look at the mechanisms available under the Code of Civil Procedure, 1908 (“CPC”) including those recently introduced to the CPC through the Commercial Courts, Commercial Division and Commercial Appellate Division of High Courts Act, 2015 (“Commercial Courts Act“). Employed effectively, they can narrow down the scope of facts and issues that need examination at trial.

Discovery under the CPC

Section 30 of the CPC provides for a court’s power to order discovery. At any time during the conduct of a suit, this provision empowers a court, either of its own motion or on the application of a party, to pass necessary and reasonable orders relating to the delivery and answering of interrogatories; the admission of documents and facts; and the discovery, inspection, production, impounding, and return of documents or other material objects that may be produced as evidence. The provision also empowers a court to issue summons to persons whose attendance is required either to give evidence or to produce documents or other objects that may be led in evidence. A court can also order any fact to be proved by way of an affidavit. While it is commonly assumed that only Order XI of the CPC corresponds to Section 30, Orders XII, XIII, and XVI also contain provisions that relate to Section 30.

What’s the role of a court in discovery proceedings?

The framework that emerges from a combined reading of Section 30 and Orders X, XI, XII, XIII, XVI, and XVIII informs us that the assumption that Indian courts lack powers of discovery because they adhere to the adversarial system of justice may not be true. In Maria Margadia Sequeria v. Erasmo Jack De Sequeria (2012), the Supreme Court, holding that discovery was one of the main purposes of the existence of courts, made some telling observations:

“A judge in the Indian System has to be regarded as failing to exercise its jurisdiction and thereby discharging its judicial duty, if in the guise of remaining neutral, he opts to remain passive to the proceedings before him. He has to always keep in mind that “every trial is a voyage of discovery in which truth is the quest”. In order to bring on record the relevant fact, he has to play an active role; no doubt within the bounds of the statutorily defined procedural law.

41. World over, modern procedural Codes are increasingly relying on full disclosure by the parties. Managerial powers of the Judge are being deployed to ensure that the scope of the factual controversy is minimized.

42. In civil cases, adherence to Section 30 CPC would also help in ascertaining the truth. It seems that this provision which ought to be frequently used is rarely pressed in service by our judicial officers and judges.”

The Court also quoted from the report of the Malimath Committee, which had highlighted the drawbacks in a strictly adversarial system and recommended that courts be statutorily mandated to become active seekers of truth. This fundamental shift in the Indian approach to disputes must be borne in mind when one invokes the mechanisms for discovery. In A. Shanmugam v. Ariya K.R.K.M.N.P.Sangam (2012), the Court, apart from reiterating the ratio of Maria Margadia Sequeria, categorically observed that ensuring discovery and production of documents and a proper admission or denial is imperative for the effective adjudication of civil cases.

Bar raised by Commercial Courts Act

The Commercial Courts Act, 2015 builds on this approach further by introducing an improved discovery mechanism, evident from the language and structure of Rules 1 to 5 in the revised Order XI, which is specific to suits of a commercial nature. The spirit of the revised framework is perhaps best captured by Sub-rule 12 of Rule 1. It unequivocally states that the duty to disclose documents that have come to the notice of the party shall continue until the disposal of the suit. It goes without saying that the reference here is to documents, which are relevant and necessary to decide any question that is germane to the dispute before the court. Critically, both parties are expected to file a list of all relevant documents which are in their power, possession, or control regardless of whether those documents support or undermine their respective positions on merits. Clearly, the bar has been raised under the Commercial Courts Act and both the parties and the courts have access to fairly effective discovery options to facilitate expeditious disposal of suits. The actual employment of these options, of course, remains to be seen.

In the next part of this series, I shall discuss framing of issues and the commencement of trial.

J. Sai Deepak is an engineer-turned-law firm partner-turned-arguing counsel. Sai is the founder of Law Chambers of J. Sai Deepak and appears primarily before the High Court of Delhi and the Supreme Court of India. He is @jsaideepak on Twitter and is the founder of the blawg “The Demanding Mistress” where he writes on economic laws, litigation, and policy. All opinions expressed here are academic and personal.

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